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Illustrated History of the Moravian Church

Illustrated History of the Moravian Church

J.E. Hutton Hosanna Fellowship Press
3.7/5 (18 ratings)
Burned at the stake. Hunted down for their faith. This illustrated edition of J. E. Hutton's captivating 500-year history depicts the Moravian Church from its early years as one of the oldest Protestant denominations to it's mature, modern form.

Hutton divides the history it into four sections. He begins with the life and martyrdom of Jan Hus, then documents the 18th-century revival under Nikolaus von Zinzendorf, the famed Pietist and social reformer. Following the revival, the Moravians began to spread their faith throughout the world, and by the turn of the 20th century, they had firm establishments throughout Europe and North America. Today, the Moravian Church has nearly one million members, and it influences millions more.

Arranged chronologically, Hutton's history takes us first to the dawn of the Protestant Reformation in the fifteenth century. He details the fraught religious and political situation during the decades prior to the eventual split with the dominant Catholic order. We are introduced to the pivotal figures of the era, such as:

• Peter of Chelci

• Gregory the Patriarch

• Luke of Prague

By harnessing popular sentiment and using new technology such as the printing presses to spread the new, Protestant doctrine, the split of Christianity occurred.

The political climate of Prague, Bohemia where the Moravians lived and died is much-detailed. The pure, simple Christian observance and his virtues united the Moravian movement - the essential devotion to Jesus, the apostles, and his gospel appealed to Christians, who yearned for community under a common banner. Poland, in particular, proved a bastion for the Moravian brethren, many of whom travelled and carried their traditions abroad.

Following the years of conflict and Reformation, the Moravians distinguished themselves as a highly competent Christian group. Members of the Moravian church were among the first missionaries to venture to the New World, which was the scene of chaotic conflicts between the rival colonial powers. The simple adherence to the word of Christ runs a common thread through the political and moral dramas, as the Moravians grappled with issues such as slavery and war, helping slaves in kindness.

The worldwide influence of the 18th century Moravian missionaries was extraordinary. One notable example is the impact they had on John Wesley, leading directly to his conversion experience. Later the Moravians established a permanent presence on George Whitefield’s estate.

Hutton's chronicle is thorough, intensively explaining the important aspects underpinning the Moravians. The development of their customs; how they congregated; the aesthetic appearance of their churches; and their establishment of parochial education are all detailed, giving the reader a vivid and valuable history.

Hutton includes the doctrinal stance of the Moravian church, indicative of the long-term effect of the historical teachings of their founder, Count Zinzendorf. Their dedication is admirable. Interestingly, they adhered to the Augsburg Confession, denouncing the Anabaptist theology regarding the sacraments. Indeed, the Moravian church emphasises experiential Christianity, that is, inner feelings and revelations as well as outward emotional raptures. In that regard, they seem to have predated the charismatics.

In short, J. E. Hutton's book provides a very interesting and fairly concise history of the Moravian movement. Highly recommended to anyone desiring a better understanding of the church predating the Anabaptists and inspired by the teaching and martyrdom of John Hus.
Pages
438
Format
Kindle Edition
Publisher
Hosanna Fellowship Press
Release
March 07, 2017
ISBN
1419124250

Illustrated History of the Moravian Church

J.E. Hutton Hosanna Fellowship Press
3.7/5 (18 ratings)
Burned at the stake. Hunted down for their faith. This illustrated edition of J. E. Hutton's captivating 500-year history depicts the Moravian Church from its early years as one of the oldest Protestant denominations to it's mature, modern form.

Hutton divides the history it into four sections. He begins with the life and martyrdom of Jan Hus, then documents the 18th-century revival under Nikolaus von Zinzendorf, the famed Pietist and social reformer. Following the revival, the Moravians began to spread their faith throughout the world, and by the turn of the 20th century, they had firm establishments throughout Europe and North America. Today, the Moravian Church has nearly one million members, and it influences millions more.

Arranged chronologically, Hutton's history takes us first to the dawn of the Protestant Reformation in the fifteenth century. He details the fraught religious and political situation during the decades prior to the eventual split with the dominant Catholic order. We are introduced to the pivotal figures of the era, such as:

• Peter of Chelci

• Gregory the Patriarch

• Luke of Prague

By harnessing popular sentiment and using new technology such as the printing presses to spread the new, Protestant doctrine, the split of Christianity occurred.

The political climate of Prague, Bohemia where the Moravians lived and died is much-detailed. The pure, simple Christian observance and his virtues united the Moravian movement - the essential devotion to Jesus, the apostles, and his gospel appealed to Christians, who yearned for community under a common banner. Poland, in particular, proved a bastion for the Moravian brethren, many of whom travelled and carried their traditions abroad.

Following the years of conflict and Reformation, the Moravians distinguished themselves as a highly competent Christian group. Members of the Moravian church were among the first missionaries to venture to the New World, which was the scene of chaotic conflicts between the rival colonial powers. The simple adherence to the word of Christ runs a common thread through the political and moral dramas, as the Moravians grappled with issues such as slavery and war, helping slaves in kindness.

The worldwide influence of the 18th century Moravian missionaries was extraordinary. One notable example is the impact they had on John Wesley, leading directly to his conversion experience. Later the Moravians established a permanent presence on George Whitefield’s estate.

Hutton's chronicle is thorough, intensively explaining the important aspects underpinning the Moravians. The development of their customs; how they congregated; the aesthetic appearance of their churches; and their establishment of parochial education are all detailed, giving the reader a vivid and valuable history.

Hutton includes the doctrinal stance of the Moravian church, indicative of the long-term effect of the historical teachings of their founder, Count Zinzendorf. Their dedication is admirable. Interestingly, they adhered to the Augsburg Confession, denouncing the Anabaptist theology regarding the sacraments. Indeed, the Moravian church emphasises experiential Christianity, that is, inner feelings and revelations as well as outward emotional raptures. In that regard, they seem to have predated the charismatics.

In short, J. E. Hutton's book provides a very interesting and fairly concise history of the Moravian movement. Highly recommended to anyone desiring a better understanding of the church predating the Anabaptists and inspired by the teaching and martyrdom of John Hus.
Pages
438
Format
Kindle Edition
Publisher
Hosanna Fellowship Press
Release
March 07, 2017
ISBN
1419124250

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